Symposium Talk from Ars Electronica

September 22, 2009

This is my talk on The Nest That Sailed The Sky I gave at the recent Ars Electronica symposium.  You can see the video here.

I had somewhat over prepared quite a lengthy lecture trying to unify the entirety of science, art and religion, delving into the most profound Buddhist thought, how it corresponds to modern science, and how my work reflects these ideas.  I also paralleled my artistic motives with Kepler, who tried to unify his mystical beliefs with his scientific views as a means to explain the meaning of life and the universe.  Kepler also taught mathematics just up the road from were I was giving the talk in Linz.

Anyway, most of it went out the window as I quickly realised I had neither the time nor was it quite the right atmosphere for something so dense.  But I managed to fumble my way through explaining the basics of my generative animation system using Music is Math as an example, and demoed Zio at the end.

This is the Jury Statement read out by Juergen as he introduces me.

“Rounding out our selection in the winner’s circle is an algorithmic animation done in Processing as a music video for Peter Gabriel’s hypnotic song.  As contrasted with some of the other entries of algorithmic animation, Glenn Marshall has worked hard on creating a metaphor for the stages of life, which are smoothly woven together in a lyrical lullaby for the eyes. We are lifted up to follow huge black vines that snake up to an abstract cloudy sky, and as they branch out in recursive patterns different seedpods are revealed. The initial palette of the world of these vines is deep green and blue, lit by an ethereal light source. As the pods grow and are left behind, the light source becomes warmer and bright red fruits contrast with the fluffy green pods. A further shift to a more golden background reveals the same small boy repeated in nest-like pods. They multiply seemingly endlessly as the black vines grow back into a blue environment again.  The jury felt that the programming/coding effort was a unique and worthy accomplishment while maintaining strong aesthetics and story line.”

The jury statement:
Rounding out our selection in the winner’s circle is an algorithmic animation done in Processing as a music video for Peter Gabriel’s hypnotic song.  As contrasted with some of the other entries of algorithmic animation, Glenn Marshall has worked hard on creating a metaphor for the stages of life, which are smoothly woven together in a lyrical lullaby for the eyes. We are lifted up to follow huge black vines that snake up to an abstract cloudy sky, and as they branch out in recursive patterns different seedpods are revealed. The initial palette of the world of these vines is deep green and blue, lit by an ethereal light source. As the pods grow and are left behind, the light source becomes warmer and bright red fruits contrast with the fluffy green pods. A further shift to a more golden background reveals the same small boy repeated in nest-like pods. They multiply seemingly endlessly as the black vines grow back into a blue environment again.  The jury felt that the programming/coding effort was a unique and worthy accomplishment while maintaining strong aesthetics and story line.

2 Responses to “Symposium Talk from Ars Electronica”

  1. Rachel Arnold said

    Would you be able to write this lecture you had prepared so we could all read it? This is important, as this would make people see deeper into your work, and other works also, as well as it being an exiting topic area.

  2. […] If you want to know more about the artist, his ideas and tools, click here. […]

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